Dominant Wound Violin E Ball End 1/16 Size Medium

Item# D130E

  • SHAR Price: $9.40
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: OUT OF STOCK
Availability: OUT OF STOCK
Availability: OUT OF STOCK
Availability: OUT OF STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK

SHAR Library:

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    Fri, Feb 03, 2012

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Question By:
POPULAR SHAR STAFF QUESTION
From ANN ARBOR, MI

Asked On: 06/21/2016

When I’m purchasing an E string for violin (or A string for viola), what’s the difference between a ball end and a loop end?

SHAR Answer:

Strings have two ends: one end that gets threaded into the peg (this is the case for every string you buy) and the other end that gets attached to the tailpiece via a fine tuner (also called string adjuster). They form tension/traction between the two ends of the instrument; that’s what makes them have sound when played. This is the case for all stringed instruments. >>For cellists & bassists, cello and bass strings are always ball end. This question doesn’t apply to them. For violinists & violists, keep reading! The lower three strings (A, D, G for violin or D, G, C for viola) will ALWAYS have ball-ends in the synthetic and steel brands, so you won’t need to worry about those. The tailpiece-end of the E string on a violin (or A string on a viola) can come in different options: either a ball end, a loop end or a ‘removable ball’ end. What will determine which string (loop or ball end) you’ll buy? It depends on which type of tailpiece or fine tuners (also called string adjusters) your violin has. You’ll have to take a look and see. The differences: A Ball End--it has a ball lodged inside the end of the string, designed to insert into the tailpiece and stay inside there. This is the most common type of E string that a beginner or young child would most likely use. A Loop End--it has a loop that goes over a prong that is attached to a fine tuner. It’s more common in full size instruments. A ‘Removable Ball’ End—it comes with a ball end that can be removed/plucked out to reveal a loop-end. Not all ball end strings are removable! Some brands have ‘removable ball’ strings. ‘Removable Ball’ strings will be marked as such, and non-removable ball-end strings will just be listed as ‘Ball’ under End type. When in doubt, or when buying strings as a surprise gift for someone else, you could choose a ‘removable ball’ end and it should work. Still not sure? Read this article.

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