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Gerle, Robert - The Art of Practicing the Violin - Violin solo - Stainer and Bell Edition

Item# 0270 008

Shar: $20.00Sale: $18.00

Out of Stock

Valuable instruction on the left hand, bow arm, sight-reading, and memorization. This book is cerain to improve your practice quality. Illustrated. (110 pp. paperback)

"Inspired by a quote from Beethoven: 'Don't only practice your art, but force your way into its secrets', this book is designed to teach the violinist to practice productively by going through time management, practicing of both hands, musical ideas and other elements of practicing. This is the ultimate practicing manual!"
- Sarah Cranor, Shar Apprentice

Stage Fright by Kato Havas

Item# H25

$26.91

Out of Stock

Stage Fright: Its Causes and Cures with Special Reference to Violin Playing. by Kato Havas.

Various aspects with exercises for release of tension and anxiety. Published by Bosworth, distributed by Hal Leonard. (136 pages, spiral-bound)

No H In Snake: Music Theory for Children by M. Yurko

Item# H77

$35.99

Out of Stock

Revised Edition. Chapters include hundreds of games for focusing on thirds and triads, lines or spaces, signs and symbols, musopoly, name that note, scales and key signatures. (264 pp, paperback)

Exploring the Bow Arm Set DVD

Item# OC2S DVD

$54.99

Bernard Greenhouse Cello Master Class Set DVD

Item# MC2SDVD

$49.99

Contains both volumes of the Bernard Greenhouse master classes.

William Pleeth Master Class Video Volume 2 DVD

Item# WMP2DVD

$19.99

Out of Stock

William Pleeth, teacher of the legendary Jaqueline du Pre' and many other internationally-recognized cellists, celebrated his eightieth birthday in 1996. To mark the event, a series of eight, one-hour films were made of his cello master classes at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies in Snape, England. The filmmakers captured William Pleeth in some of his finest work ever as a master teacher, in the best-known and loved repertoire for the cello: the Elgar Concerto, Beethoven, and Brahms Sonatas, the Hadyn D Major Concerto and the Tchaikovsky Rococo Variations.

William Pleeth Books & DVDs: Synopsis/reviews>/b>
Reviewer: Helen Neilson, London.

In 1996, Selma Gokcen produced a series of Books & DVDs recordings of William Pleeths masterclasses at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies. This unique series is an important addition to the historical cellistic literature, celebrating the life and work of this highly respected cellist and teacher who influenced the paths of numerous cellists around the globe. He is perhaps most famously known as the teacher of Jacqueline du Pr, but led a life where he helped generations of developing cellists. He also enjoyed an illustrious performing career based in the United Kingdom, following his Leipzig Gewandhaus debut aged fifteen.
2. Barber: Sonata, op. 6. Allegro ma non troppo.
Veronica Freeman, vcl; Carole Presland, pno.

Bad-tempered! Youve got a temper, havent you? Use it then, darling! The supremacy of the spirit or emotion of any musical phrase or gesture is always considered the vital driving force. He encourages the player to utilise what is already present within, to explore and realise her own potential. Throughout the series, he discusses the musical rationale behind technical considerations such as choices of bowings and fingerings. However, he emphasises that the emotion must never be separated from the rational choices which must be made. The emotion and physics sit in one anothers hands. Undivorceable.
His awareness of natural tendencies is acute on many levels, and he articulates this in particular with respect to timing patterns. Any rubato must sit in a framework... If you have your frame, you can move around within that. This regard for the structure of expressive timing patterns, whose formal investigation by scientists is only now in its infancy, clearly comes from his innate feeling and understanding as a musician, and from his own sensitivity to the supremacy of musical form.
An interesting cellistic issue which he addresses in this particular episode is the balance between the left and the right arms. He points out that if too much force is used in the left hand, this can detract from the weight available to make sound with the right. What in fact is needed is more release in the left hand, and therefore greater freedom in the right. We cant make holes in the cello with the left hand but you can break the cello with the right. (Demonstrates weighty bow arm!)


Wliliam Pleeth Review: Rob Lewis - London

Volume 2 Barber Sonata, Op.6

Pleeth focuses on sound production at the beginning of Barbers Cello Sonata, making sure that there is continuous resonance and quality. He talks about the contact point of the bow on the string, and demonstrates how different moods can be created. The Barber Sonata needs an intense sound at the beginning, and the way to achieve this is discussed at great length, making sure the bow is in contact with the string and not skating on the surface.
The shapes of the phrases are also discussed, and the pupil is encouraged to take risks with fingerings, with the overall aim being that as the intensity grows, the fingerings and sound produced should all work together to capture the emotion of the music.
He also demonstrates ways of making the faster passages retain clarity by articulating each note with the bow. This helps project the sound from the very bottom notes on the cello, right through the whole range of the instrument. This emphasis on resonance is further expressed in the second subject, where Pleeth also talks about the importance of sitting in the frame work of the piece rhythmically speaking, to allow movement within the theme.

William Pleeth Master Class Video Volume 3 DVD

Item# WMP3DVD

$19.99

Out of Stock

William Pleeth, teacher of the legendary Jaqueline du Pre' and many other internationally-recognized cellists, celebrated his eightieth birthday in 1996. To mark the event, a series of eight, one-hour films were made of his cello master classes at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies in Snape, England. The filmmakers captured William Pleeth in some of his finest work ever as a master teacher, in the best-known and loved repertoire for the cello: the Elgar Concerto, Beethoven, and Brahms Sonatas, the Hadyn D Major Concerto and the Tchaikovsky Rococo Variations.

William Pleeth Books & DVDs: Synopsis/reviews
Reviewer: Helen Neilson, London.

In 1996, Selma Gokcen produced a series of Books & DVDs recordings of William Pleeths masterclasses at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies. This unique series is an important addition to the historical cellistic literature, celebrating the life and work of this highly respected cellist and teacher who influenced the paths of numerous cellists around the globe. He is perhaps most famously known as the teacher of Jacqueline du Pr, but led a life where he helped generations of developing cellists. He also enjoyed an illustrious performing career based in the United Kingdom, following his Leipzig Gewandhaus debut aged fifteen.
3. Elgar: Cello Concerto in E minor, op. 85. Adagio moderato.
Kate Bennett, vcl; Frances Angell, pno.

William Pleeth emphasises the importance of observing every little detail of what is written in the score in his discussion with Kate Bennett of the first movement of the Elgar Concerto. He talks in particular about giving absolute value to the rhythms, and also demands acute observation of the articulation markings in the opening sections. In particular, he draws her attention to the tenuto lines over the third and fourth semiquavers in the ascending second passage, which he then mentions again in the interview at the end of this episode. His comment on giving the full love to the quaver in the rocking crotchet/quaver rhythm of the main theme is an endearing way of describing something to which often insufficient attention is given by developing performers.
One cannot help but wonder what he would have thought of the work of Rudolf Laban, whose development of movement in dance was founded so strongly upon the relationship of the gesture to the inner impulse. Laban took this to such lengths that he attributed qualities of space, weight, time and flow to various internal impulses in an attempt to broaden his dance students awareness of and connection with different inner sensations. In cello playing, this idea of the inner impulse as the leader of gesture can be directly attributed to the use of the bow arm. He relates this directly to the parallels with dance, after he comments, Gesture of the arm is the physical imprint of a feel.
Again, he comes to a point which in more recent times has been explored more thoroughly in academic papers, but from a place of practical experience and intuitive thought.. He talks about the use of the left hand by cellists in the higher positions, where we can so often constrained by the idea that we must train the hand to play in octaves. He quite rightly asks why it is that we cannot think more in the manner of pianists, who can stretch or contract the hand easily, and still retain confidence in reaching the notes aimed for. This, and further ramifications of comparing the use of the left hand of cellists with that of pianists has been discussed more recently in great depth by Tania Lisboa.2 His observations tend to draw upon witnessing and believing in human possibility in the first instance, as well as a desire to gain musical freedom in every possible way on the cello. He also strongly encourages more active use of the fourth finger on several occasions.
An interesting point which he addresses in particular in this volume is the idea of natural aural receptivity. The trouble is that the ear, from babyhood, has never been enticed or seduced into, literally, RECEIVING. He talks about the qualities of passive receptivity inherent in the nose, and our attitude in general towards our sense of smell. Why should the same not apply to the use of the ears, he asks? The main thing is that receiving is EVERYTHING. He encourages the cellists to be aware of developing their aural sense in relation to what they are doing on the cello in order to fully utilise this natural sense.


Wliliam Pleeth Review: Rob Lewis - London

Volume 3 Elgar Cello Concerto in E minor
Here Pleeth emphasises the importance of making the opening passages speak in the Elgar concerto. He talks about creating a dialogue within the first few lines, where rhythmic emphasis in the short phrases combines to paint an overall accurate picture or landscape within the music.
He focuses on being relaxed and present when playing the first subject so that the mood of the music is expressed in harmony with the artist playing it. This idea seems to bring a different quality to the music, as the sound created projects in a more natural way and ideas are expressed more clearly.
Singing the phrases in the context of a strong rhythmic framework is important. It helps to project the sound through drawing the string, which has an instant impact on the pupils sound.

Mimi Zweig String Pedagogy 2008 edition DVD

Item# MZ1DVD

$85.00

Out of Stock

This new Multimedia Reference Books & DVDs-ROM includes over 70 video clips that illustrate Mimi Zweig'

Rosindust by Cornelia Watkins

Item# H298P

$28.95

Out of Stock

Rosindust: Teaching, Learning and Life from a Cellist's Perspective by Cornelia Watkins

Drawing on thirty years of teaching and learning the cello, Cornelia Watkins has written a comprehensive guide to teaching that is both personal and universal. A compelling blend of story-telling, psychology, philosophy and technique, Rosindust takes a candid look at the day-to-day challenges of teaching - but keeps in mind the experience of learning from the students' point of view. Based on the premise that the study of a stringed instrument can have a powerful, positive effect on developing the whole person, Watkins offers practical ways to promote self-awareness, problem-solving skills and creative thinking.

"Corky writes eloquently in her essays about the topics that studio teachers are addressing daily. Her sincerity and honesty in presenting situations, problems and solutions are inspiring. This is an important addition to the libraries of teachers, students and parents." - Mimi Zweig, Jacobs School of Music and author of StringPedagogy.com

Beyond Talent by Angela Myles Beeching

Item# H315P

$19.99

Out of Stock

Gerou / Lusk - Essentials of Music Notation: A Practical Dictionary - Alfred Music Publishing

Item# H232

$11.95

Out of Stock

Have you ever wanted to write your own music, but weren't sure where to start? Alfred's Essentials of Music Notation is a helpful reference tool for any would-be composer or arranger! Learn the tricks to communicating effectively in the musical "language": this book includes vital information on proper note formatting, when to use certain types of ornaments, correct slur and note-stem direction, and more. Arranged in a practical dictionary format, it is a great quick-guide resource for all musicians, amateur to professional.

Written by Tom Gerou and Linda Lusk. Published by Alfred Music Publishing.

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