Thomastik Alphayue Violin String Set 1/16 Size

Item# AL100S 116

  • List Price: $37.99
  • SHAR Price: $20.99
Availability: IN STOCK

About This Item

Why settle for steel strings? Alphayue strings were carefully developed to be a serious student's first string. Synthetic core, with aluminum wound A and D, silver wound G, solid steel E, tin plated. Alphayue strings tune in quickly, work well with fine tuners, and are forgiving, stable and durable.

Warranty Info

The Best String Guarantee
Please inspect your strings immediately upon receipt. Installed strings are not returnable, unless they break within the first 30 days after purchase.

30-Day String Return Policy
Unopened strings may be returned within 30 days, so that we may supply all our customers with the freshest possible strings. Because of tonal qualities of each instrument are unique, we cannot accept string returns for reasons of tone, including false strings.

If you have any questions about this product's warranty or to make a return, please contact our Customer Service Department at 800.793.4334 or email us at [email protected]
Why settle for steel strings? Alphayue strings were carefully developed to be a serious student's first string. Synthetic core, with aluminum wound A and D, silver wound G, solid steel E, tin plated. Alphayue strings tune in quickly, work well with fine tuners, and are forgiving, stable and durable.
The Best String Guarantee
Please inspect your strings immediately upon receipt. Installed strings are not returnable, unless they break within the first 30 days after purchase.

30-Day String Return Policy
Unopened strings may be returned within 30 days, so that we may supply all our customers with the freshest possible strings. Because of tonal qualities of each instrument are unique, we cannot accept string returns for reasons of tone, including false strings.

If you have any questions about this product's warranty or to make a return, please contact our Customer Service Department at 800.793.4334 or email us at [email protected]

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Question By:
POPULAR SHAR STAFF QUESTION
From ANN ARBOR, MI

Asked On: 08/02/2016

Oh, no! I broke a string! What should I do? Will this damage my instrument?

SHAR Answer:

No worries, it’s okay! This definitely happens now and then and it’s nothing to be too worried about. Unless all four strings broke at the same time (highly unlikely) and the bridge completely collapsed, it’s unlikely that there is any damage at all to your instrument. If it’s just simply one string that broke, then you’ll just need to purchase a new one and install it.

Unfortunately, broken strings cannot be repaired. They need to be replaced if they are broken. You can usually find them at a local violin shop. You can buy an individual string (only the A string, for example), if that's the one that's broken, or we also sell strings in a set of all four strings (E, A, D & G for violin and A,D,G & C for viola and cello). We sell a wide variety of brands of strings here at Shar--you can order them here online or over the phone. Our customer care representatives can help you place an order for new strings at 800.248.7427.

It's fairly uncommon for strings to just randomly snap. This is more likely to happen if the strings are older, worn out, or not in good condition. That’s why it’s a good idea to replace your strings periodically (their longevity will depend on how much you play) and keep your strings/instrument in proper condition. It’s also a good idea to purchase and keep an extra set of strings handy in your case, just in case a string breaks right before a lesson or performance and you need to replace it.

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20 people found this question helpful.

Question By:
POPULAR SHAR STAFF QUESTION
From ANN ARBOR, MI

Asked On: 07/20/2016

When I’m purchasing an E string for violin (or A string for viola), what’s the difference between a ball end and a loop end?

SHAR Answer:

Strings have two ends: one end that gets threaded into the peg (this is the case for every string you buy) and the other end that gets attached to the tailpiece via a fine tuner (also called string adjuster). They form tension/traction between the two ends of the instrument; that’s what makes them have sound when played. This is the case for all stringed instruments.

>>For cellists & bassists, cello and bass strings are always ball end. This question doesn’t apply to them.

For violinists & violists, keep reading!
The lower three strings (A, D, G for violin or D, G, C for viola) will ALWAYS have ball-ends in the synthetic and steel brands, so you won’t need to worry about those. The tailpiece-end of the E string on a violin (or A string on a viola) can come in different options: either a ball end, a loop end or a ‘removable ball’ end. What will determine which string (loop or ball end) you’ll buy? It depends on which type of tailpiece or fine tuners (also called string adjusters) your violin has. You’ll have to take a look and see.

The differences:
A Ball End--it has a ball lodged inside the end of the string, designed to insert into the tailpiece and stay inside there. This is the most common type of E string that a beginner or young child would most likely use.
A Loop End--it has a loop that goes over a prong that is attached to a fine tuner. It’s more common in full size instruments.
A ‘Removable Ball’ End—it comes with a ball end that can be removed/plucked out to reveal a loop-end. Not all ball end strings are removable! Some brands have ‘removable ball’ strings. ‘Removable Ball’ strings will be marked as such, and non-removable ball-end strings will just be listed as ‘Ball’ under End type. When in doubt, or when buying strings as a surprise gift for someone else, you could choose a ‘removable ball’ end and it should work.

Still not sure? Read this article.

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16 people found this question helpful.

Question By:
POPULAR SHAR STAFF QUESTION
From ANN ARBOR, MI

Asked On: 07/20/2016

Beginner student asks: When purchasing strings, how do I know if i am getting ball end or loop end strings?

SHAR Answer:

You have a choice to purchase either one. It will tell you which one you’re ordering in the description of the string that you’re shopping for. You’ll want to take care to choose the correct one that you want. If you’re a parent and you’re shopping for your beginner or young child, it’s most likely that your child would use a ball-end E string (for violinists), or a ball-end A string (for violists). If you’re not sure which one you should buy, check out this article for more advice.

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17 people found this question helpful.

Question By:
POPULAR SHAR STAFF QUESTION
From ANN ARBOR, MI

Asked On: 07/20/2016

Are these ball ends?

SHAR Answer:

Yes! They have little metal rings called balls on one end. This is the end that goes inside of the tailpiece or fine tuner. The A, D, G strings in this set of Thomastik Alphayue Violin strings come with ball-ends. The E string comes with a removable-ball end. What's a ‘Removable Ball’ end? It's a string that comes with a ball end that can be removed/plucked out to reveal a loop-end. Unsure about what type of string end your violin needs? Read this article. And if you're looking for instructions on how to change a string, check out this video.

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19 people found this question helpful.

Question By:
POPULAR SHAR STAFF QUESTION
From ANN ARBOR, MI

Asked On: 07/20/2016

I’m just learning to play. What does medium, heavy, light gauge mean? Which should I buy?

SHAR Answer:

Strings are able to stay in place on a violin because they are held there by tension/traction (they are not glued onto anything). Strings have two ends; one end that gets threaded into the peg and the other end that gets attached to the tailpiece via a fine tuner (also called string adjuster). They form tension/traction between the two ends of the instrument; that’s what makes them have sound when played. When you hear someone refer to medium, heavy or light gauge (or tension), they're referring to the thin or thickness of a string, which can impact the sound and response of a string. If you're just starting out, I would recommend medium (also referred to as medium/standard gauge). If you’re a parent buying replacement strings for the first time and you’re not sure, I would stick with medium/standard gauge. Without getting into too many complex details, just know that there are many factors (diameter/thickness/gauge, raw materials, pitch) that determine your string tension. Your string gauge/diameter alone does not determine a string’s tension, but can play a part in it. Buying a matched set of strings (all medium, for example) could give you the confidence that the gauges work well together. The choice of which gauge to use is a personal one, based on your playing style and the tone you are trying to achieve. As you progress and become more advanced, you’ll likely develop more of an opinion about what types of strings (including their material and their gauges) that you like best. For many more details about choosing strings, check out this page. http://www.sharmusic.com/Pages/How-To/Strings/

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21 people found this question helpful.

Question By:
POPULAR SHAR STAFF QUESTION
From ANN ARBOR, MI

Asked On: 07/20/2016

How many strings come in a set? How many are inside these packets?

SHAR Answer:

There are all 4 strings included in a set. It includes the strings E, A, D & G. Each string comes inside its own separate packet, so there is one string tucked inside each packet and there are four packets total in a set of strings.

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20 people found this question helpful.

Question By:
POPULAR SHAR STAFF QUESTION
From ANN ARBOR, MI

Asked On: 07/20/2016

Would these strings work on a student violin?

SHAR Answer:

Yes! These strings would work very well on a student’s violin. These strings have a good balance between playability, sound quality and reasonable pricing. These strings offer good pitch stability. They also are extremely durable (especially given that they’re synthetic core, not steel core) strings. Just FYI, re-stringing a violin can be tricky, especially if you’re an inexperienced beginner, because it’s possible to break strings in the process. So it can be good to use a set of strings that is relatively inexpensive because if you or your child breaks one, the affordable price makes it not the end of the world. However, these strings are not the least expensive choice currently on the market.

For all of these reasons, these strings are a solid choice if you’re a student or the parent of a student.

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18 people found this question helpful.

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