Helicore Viola String Set

Item# 765S

  • SHAR Price: $50.90
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK
Availability: IN STOCK

About This Item

D'Addario Helicore Viola String Set. Steel core.

Warranty Info

The Best String Guarantee
Please inspect your strings immediately upon receipt. Installed strings are not returnable, unless they break within the first 30 days after purchase.

30-Day String Return Policy
Unopened strings may be returned within 30 days, so that we may supply all our customers with the freshest possible strings. Because of tonal qualities of each instrument are unique, we cannot accept string returns for reasons of tone, including false strings.

If you have any questions about this product's warranty or to make a return, please contact our Customer Service Department at 800.793.4334 or email us at [email protected]

About This Brand

D'Addario
A family craft brought over from Italy. Made in the USA since 1918.

With a family string-making tradition stretching back to at least 1680 in Italy, Charles D'Addario emigrated to the US by 1918 and started making strings in New York. Through the generations new technologies have been adopted and D'Addario now makes an extensive line of strings, all proudly made in the USA. 
D'Addario Helicore Viola String Set. Steel core.
The Best String Guarantee
Please inspect your strings immediately upon receipt. Installed strings are not returnable, unless they break within the first 30 days after purchase.

30-Day String Return Policy
Unopened strings may be returned within 30 days, so that we may supply all our customers with the freshest possible strings. Because of tonal qualities of each instrument are unique, we cannot accept string returns for reasons of tone, including false strings.

If you have any questions about this product's warranty or to make a return, please contact our Customer Service Department at 800.793.4334 or email us at [email protected]
D'Addario
A family craft brought over from Italy. Made in the USA since 1918.

With a family string-making tradition stretching back to at least 1680 in Italy, Charles D'Addario emigrated to the US by 1918 and started making strings in New York. Through the generations new technologies have been adopted and D'Addario now makes an extensive line of strings, all proudly made in the USA. 

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Question By:
POPULAR SHAR STAFF QUESTION
From ANN ARBOR, MI

Asked On: 07/20/2016

When I’m purchasing an E string for violin (or A string for viola), what’s the difference between a ball end and a loop end?

SHAR Answer:

Strings have two ends: one end that gets threaded into the peg (this is the case for every string you buy) and the other end that gets attached to the tailpiece via a fine tuner (also called string adjuster). They form tension/traction between the two ends of the instrument; that’s what makes them have sound when played. This is the case for all stringed instruments.

>>For cellists & bassists, cello and bass strings are always ball end. This question doesn’t apply to them.

For violinists & violists, keep reading!
The lower three strings (A, D, G for violin or D, G, C for viola) will ALWAYS have ball-ends in the synthetic and steel brands, so you won’t need to worry about those. The tailpiece-end of the E string on a violin (or A string on a viola) can come in different options: either a ball end, a loop end or a ‘removable ball’ end. What will determine which string (loop or ball end) you’ll buy? It depends on which type of tailpiece or fine tuners (also called string adjusters) your violin has. You’ll have to take a look and see.

The differences:
A Ball End--it has a ball lodged inside the end of the string, designed to insert into the tailpiece and stay inside there. This is the most common type of E string that a beginner or young child would most likely use.
A Loop End--it has a loop that goes over a prong that is attached to a fine tuner. It’s more common in full size instruments.
A ‘Removable Ball’ End—it comes with a ball end that can be removed/plucked out to reveal a loop-end. Not all ball end strings are removable! Some brands have ‘removable ball’ strings. ‘Removable Ball’ strings will be marked as such, and non-removable ball-end strings will just be listed as ‘Ball’ under End type. When in doubt, or when buying strings as a surprise gift for someone else, you could choose a ‘removable ball’ end and it should work.

Still not sure? Read this article.

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11 people found this question helpful.

Question By:
POPULAR SHAR STAFF QUESTION
From ANN ARBOR, MI

Asked On: 07/20/2016

I’m just learning to play. What does medium, heavy, light gauge mean? Which should I buy?

SHAR Answer:

Strings are able to stay in place on a violin because they are held there by tension/traction (they are not glued onto anything). Strings have two ends; one end that gets threaded into the peg and the other end that gets attached to the tailpiece via a fine tuner (also called string adjuster). They form tension/traction between the two ends of the instrument; that’s what makes them have sound when played. When you hear someone refer to medium, heavy or light gauge (or tension), they're referring to the thin or thickness of a string, which can impact the sound and response of a string. If you're just starting out, I would recommend medium (also referred to as medium/standard gauge). If you’re a parent buying replacement strings for the first time and you’re not sure, I would stick with medium/standard gauge. Without getting into too many complex details, just know that there are many factors (diameter/thickness/gauge, raw materials, pitch) that determine your string tension. Your string gauge/diameter alone does not determine a string’s tension, but can play a part in it. Buying a matched set of strings (all medium, for example) could give you the confidence that the gauges work well together. The choice of which gauge to use is a personal one, based on your playing style and the tone you are trying to achieve. As you progress and become more advanced, you’ll likely develop more of an opinion about what types of strings (including their material and their gauges) that you like best. For many more details about choosing strings, check out this page. http://www.sharmusic.com/Pages/How-To/Strings/

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16 people found this question helpful.

Question By:
POPULAR SHAR STAFF QUESTION
From ANN ARBOR, MI

Asked On: 07/20/2016

How many strings come in a set? How many are inside these packets?

SHAR Answer:

There are all 4 strings included in a set. It includes the strings A, D, G & C. Each string comes inside its own separate packet, so there is one string tucked inside each packet and there are four packets total in a set of strings.

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15 people found this question helpful.

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