190 Items

Filter Page 1

Your Selections:

Clear All

190 Items

Exploring the Bow Arm Set DVD

Item# OC2S DVD

$54.99

In Stock

Bernard Greenhouse Cello Master Class Set DVD

Item# MC2SDVD

$49.99

In Stock

Contains both volumes of the Bernard Greenhouse master classes.

William Pleeth Master Class Video Volume 2 DVD

Item# WMP2DVD

$19.99

Out of Stock

William Pleeth, teacher of the legendary Jaqueline du Pre' and many other internationally-recognized cellists, celebrated his eightieth birthday in 1996. To mark the event, a series of eight, one-hour films were made of his cello master classes at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies in Snape, England. The filmmakers captured William Pleeth in some of his finest work ever as a master teacher, in the best-known and loved repertoire for the cello: the Elgar Concerto, Beethoven, and Brahms Sonatas, the Hadyn D Major Concerto and the Tchaikovsky Rococo Variations.

William Pleeth Books & DVDs: Synopsis/reviews>/b>
Reviewer: Helen Neilson, London.

In 1996, Selma Gokcen produced a series of Books & DVDs recordings of William Pleeths masterclasses at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies. This unique series is an important addition to the historical cellistic literature, celebrating the life and work of this highly respected cellist and teacher who influenced the paths of numerous cellists around the globe. He is perhaps most famously known as the teacher of Jacqueline du Pr, but led a life where he helped generations of developing cellists. He also enjoyed an illustrious performing career based in the United Kingdom, following his Leipzig Gewandhaus debut aged fifteen.
2. Barber: Sonata, op. 6. Allegro ma non troppo.
Veronica Freeman, vcl; Carole Presland, pno.

Bad-tempered! Youve got a temper, havent you? Use it then, darling! The supremacy of the spirit or emotion of any musical phrase or gesture is always considered the vital driving force. He encourages the player to utilise what is already present within, to explore and realise her own potential. Throughout the series, he discusses the musical rationale behind technical considerations such as choices of bowings and fingerings. However, he emphasises that the emotion must never be separated from the rational choices which must be made. The emotion and physics sit in one anothers hands. Undivorceable.
His awareness of natural tendencies is acute on many levels, and he articulates this in particular with respect to timing patterns. Any rubato must sit in a framework... If you have your frame, you can move around within that. This regard for the structure of expressive timing patterns, whose formal investigation by scientists is only now in its infancy, clearly comes from his innate feeling and understanding as a musician, and from his own sensitivity to the supremacy of musical form.
An interesting cellistic issue which he addresses in this particular episode is the balance between the left and the right arms. He points out that if too much force is used in the left hand, this can detract from the weight available to make sound with the right. What in fact is needed is more release in the left hand, and therefore greater freedom in the right. We cant make holes in the cello with the left hand but you can break the cello with the right. (Demonstrates weighty bow arm!)


Wliliam Pleeth Review: Rob Lewis - London

Volume 2 Barber Sonata, Op.6

Pleeth focuses on sound production at the beginning of Barbers Cello Sonata, making sure that there is continuous resonance and quality. He talks about the contact point of the bow on the string, and demonstrates how different moods can be created. The Barber Sonata needs an intense sound at the beginning, and the way to achieve this is discussed at great length, making sure the bow is in contact with the string and not skating on the surface.
The shapes of the phrases are also discussed, and the pupil is encouraged to take risks with fingerings, with the overall aim being that as the intensity grows, the fingerings and sound produced should all work together to capture the emotion of the music.
He also demonstrates ways of making the faster passages retain clarity by articulating each note with the bow. This helps project the sound from the very bottom notes on the cello, right through the whole range of the instrument. This emphasis on resonance is further expressed in the second subject, where Pleeth also talks about the importance of sitting in the frame work of the piece rhythmically speaking, to allow movement within the theme.

William Pleeth Master Class Video Volume 3 DVD

Item# WMP3DVD

$19.99

Out of Stock

William Pleeth, teacher of the legendary Jaqueline du Pre' and many other internationally-recognized cellists, celebrated his eightieth birthday in 1996. To mark the event, a series of eight, one-hour films were made of his cello master classes at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies in Snape, England. The filmmakers captured William Pleeth in some of his finest work ever as a master teacher, in the best-known and loved repertoire for the cello: the Elgar Concerto, Beethoven, and Brahms Sonatas, the Hadyn D Major Concerto and the Tchaikovsky Rococo Variations.

William Pleeth Books & DVDs: Synopsis/reviews
Reviewer: Helen Neilson, London.

In 1996, Selma Gokcen produced a series of Books & DVDs recordings of William Pleeths masterclasses at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies. This unique series is an important addition to the historical cellistic literature, celebrating the life and work of this highly respected cellist and teacher who influenced the paths of numerous cellists around the globe. He is perhaps most famously known as the teacher of Jacqueline du Pr, but led a life where he helped generations of developing cellists. He also enjoyed an illustrious performing career based in the United Kingdom, following his Leipzig Gewandhaus debut aged fifteen.
3. Elgar: Cello Concerto in E minor, op. 85. Adagio moderato.
Kate Bennett, vcl; Frances Angell, pno.

William Pleeth emphasises the importance of observing every little detail of what is written in the score in his discussion with Kate Bennett of the first movement of the Elgar Concerto. He talks in particular about giving absolute value to the rhythms, and also demands acute observation of the articulation markings in the opening sections. In particular, he draws her attention to the tenuto lines over the third and fourth semiquavers in the ascending second passage, which he then mentions again in the interview at the end of this episode. His comment on giving the full love to the quaver in the rocking crotchet/quaver rhythm of the main theme is an endearing way of describing something to which often insufficient attention is given by developing performers.
One cannot help but wonder what he would have thought of the work of Rudolf Laban, whose development of movement in dance was founded so strongly upon the relationship of the gesture to the inner impulse. Laban took this to such lengths that he attributed qualities of space, weight, time and flow to various internal impulses in an attempt to broaden his dance students awareness of and connection with different inner sensations. In cello playing, this idea of the inner impulse as the leader of gesture can be directly attributed to the use of the bow arm. He relates this directly to the parallels with dance, after he comments, Gesture of the arm is the physical imprint of a feel.
Again, he comes to a point which in more recent times has been explored more thoroughly in academic papers, but from a place of practical experience and intuitive thought.. He talks about the use of the left hand by cellists in the higher positions, where we can so often constrained by the idea that we must train the hand to play in octaves. He quite rightly asks why it is that we cannot think more in the manner of pianists, who can stretch or contract the hand easily, and still retain confidence in reaching the notes aimed for. This, and further ramifications of comparing the use of the left hand of cellists with that of pianists has been discussed more recently in great depth by Tania Lisboa.2 His observations tend to draw upon witnessing and believing in human possibility in the first instance, as well as a desire to gain musical freedom in every possible way on the cello. He also strongly encourages more active use of the fourth finger on several occasions.
An interesting point which he addresses in particular in this volume is the idea of natural aural receptivity. The trouble is that the ear, from babyhood, has never been enticed or seduced into, literally, RECEIVING. He talks about the qualities of passive receptivity inherent in the nose, and our attitude in general towards our sense of smell. Why should the same not apply to the use of the ears, he asks? The main thing is that receiving is EVERYTHING. He encourages the cellists to be aware of developing their aural sense in relation to what they are doing on the cello in order to fully utilise this natural sense.


Wliliam Pleeth Review: Rob Lewis - London

Volume 3 Elgar Cello Concerto in E minor
Here Pleeth emphasises the importance of making the opening passages speak in the Elgar concerto. He talks about creating a dialogue within the first few lines, where rhythmic emphasis in the short phrases combines to paint an overall accurate picture or landscape within the music.
He focuses on being relaxed and present when playing the first subject so that the mood of the music is expressed in harmony with the artist playing it. This idea seems to bring a different quality to the music, as the sound created projects in a more natural way and ideas are expressed more clearly.
Singing the phrases in the context of a strong rhythmic framework is important. It helps to project the sound through drawing the string, which has an instant impact on the pupils sound.

William Pleeth Master Class Video Volume 4 DVD

Item# WMP4DVD

$19.99

Out of Stock

William Pleeth, teacher of the legendary Jaqueline du Pre' and many other internationally-recognized cellists, celebrated his eightieth birthday in 1996. To mark the event, a series of eight, one-hour films were made of his cello master classes at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies in Snape, England. The filmmakers captured William Pleeth in some of his finest work ever as a master teacher, in the best-known and loved repertoire for the cello: the Elgar Concerto, Beethoven, and Brahms Sonatas, the Hadyn D Major Concerto and the Tchaikovsky Rococo Variations.

William Pleeth Books & DVDs: Synopsis/reviews
Reviewer: Helen Neilson, London.

In 1996, Selma Gokcen produced a series of Books & DVDs recordings of William Pleeths masterclasses at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies. This unique series is an important addition to the historical cellistic literature, celebrating the life and work of this highly respected cellist and teacher who influenced the paths of numerous cellists around the globe. He is perhaps most famously known as the teacher of Jacqueline du Pr, but led a life where he helped generations of developing cellists. He also enjoyed an illustrious performing career based in the United Kingdom, following his Leipzig Gewandhaus debut aged fifteen.

4. Beethoven Sonata in C major, op. 102, no. 1. Andante Allegro vivace.
Daisy Gathorne-Hardy, vcl; Carole Presland, pno.

Vibrato mustnt be a habit. Its a servant of every nuance of feeling there is. The opening of Beethovens Sonata in C major provides a perfect place to investigate the finest nuances of different vibratos in order to create varied musical effects. He encourages the student to think about voicings, colour colour for its own sake in your own line colour in relation to your partner above all in counterpoint, in voicings that should match him or her or contradict and so on He enjoys vociferously deriding what he terms the one-gear vibrato. Dont tell me its not an illness, he says after complaining that in most concerts one goes to, we hear the same wobble for two hours at a time! Again, the importance of the consideration of the ensemble is paramount in exploring the range of textures.
The student initially looks somewhat bemused as he states, the worst thing that most players have is good rhythm. However, he then goes on to elucidate his point further. Its not just rhythm 1234 in a bar, its the inner impulse of something [Traces curves of body of cello.] This is rhythm; that is logic. Its the inevitability of the curve. That is rhythm, darling. Logic. It is his instinctive appreciation of the underlying proportions and dynamic sense of musical form that is vital. One also wonders whether he was aware of the cyclographs of Percival Hodgson, tracing the bowing arms of string players in 1934, who uses exactly the same phrase, the inevitability of the curve to describe those specific motions3 Pleeths natural appreciation of the physics of both string playing and musical motion in their truest sense come through repeatedly. By Mother Nature, not by anybody!

William Pleeth Review: Rob Lewis - London
Volume 4 Beethoven Sonata in C, Op. 102, No.1

As the Beethoven Sonatas are very much based on the piano playing an equal part in the performance, Pleeth discusses how the phrasing and articulation in the cello part should be based around the figures played by the piano. He particularly refers to the more staccato passages, where, by lifting the bow to re-articulate the notes, the cello can match the piano part in colour and texture.
He also focuses on how it is important to use one finger at a time to play a note so that there is a good quality of sound and the vibrato remains free. This also allows the fingers to be more independent. The example of being able to stretch much more freely and to clean up intonation is instantly applied to the opening passage.
The matter of tempo is explored to find a more tender, leisurely pace to the movement, allowing each note to sing and for each note to receive proper stress.

William Pleeth Master Class Video Volume 5 DVD

Item# WMP5DVD

$19.99

Out of Stock

William Pleeth, teacher of the legendary Jaqueline du Pre' and many other internationally-recognized cellists, celebrated his eightieth birthday in 1996. To mark the event, a series of eight, one-hour films were made of his cello master classes at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies in Snape, England. The filmmakers captured William Pleeth in some of his finest work ever as a master teacher, in the best-known and loved repertoire for the cello: the Elgar Concerto, Beethoven, and Brahms Sonatas, the Hadyn D Major Concerto and the Tchaikovsky Rococo Variations.

William Pleeth Books & DVDs: Synopsis/reviews
Reviewer: Helen Neilson, London.

In 1996, Selma Gokcen produced a series of Books & DVDs recordings of William Pleeths masterclasses at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies. This unique series is an important addition to the historical cellistic literature, celebrating the life and work of this highly respected cellist and teacher who influenced the paths of numerous cellists around the globe. He is perhaps most famously known as the teacher of Jacqueline du Pr, but led a life where he helped generations of developing cellists. He also enjoyed an illustrious performing career based in the United Kingdom, following his Leipzig Gewandhaus debut aged fifteen.

5. Haydn, Concerto in D major, Hob VIIb: 2. Allegro moderato.
Sheena Mckenzie, vcl; Peggy Gray, pno.

In Pleeths session on Haydns D major concerto, we get the impression that he may have previously taught this student. Therefore, there appears to be a slightly different balance, with his comments related directly to the music, and less an extended discussion of philosophical points. For anyone studying this piece, his suggestions of various bowings and fingerings would certainly be useful for consideration. At all times, the sense of the figures is paramount in this intricate piece, which he calls the worlds most difficult concerto.
In terms of the approach to the passagework, he encourages the student to get away from the mentality of approaching scales as presented in the study book. Reminding her that scales in the study book have no sentiment, he maintains that many cellists tend practice them wrongly as a result. At many times, he reiterates the importance of knowing the cello backwards. He mentions at various points throughout the series the value of really being secure in the knowledge of where the notes are all across the cello. Also, the importance of release in the left hand is addressed in this volume.
The most vital point, which he talks at great length about in each session, is the problem of string players choosing what he terms convenience fingerings. He at all times encourages them to think first from the music, rather than from a place of what sits comfortably under the hand on a string instrument. It sounds like stirring mud! he exclaims at one point when disenchanted with the choice of colour a certain fingering produces. Pleeths feeling was that we must think first as musicians, regardless of the particular technical challenges of whatever instrument we happen to be playing on. Were supposed to be musicians on that instrument.


William Pleeth Review: Rob Lewis - London
Volume 5 Haydn Concerto in D major

In order to make the opening theme clearer, Pleeth talks about the need to personalise the bowing to allow the music to breathe instead of just following the written notation. He discusses how artists have to think for themselves about what is the best way to let the music speak, whether it is through changing the fingering or the bowing in order to express the character of the music. In one example, where the pupil slides up using a harmonic in the opening theme, another fingering is suggested which allows the shift to be more expressive. The idea of being adaptable to different fingerings is an important one, and William Pleeth discusses how cellists should be able to vary their fingerings without too much thought or practise. In the Haydn he illustrates his point with a D-Major scale run in the opening section. He offers several fingerings, all of which give a different character to the music. He mentions that the pupil has to choose the fingering that makes the passage speak in the best possible way.

William Pleeth Master Class Video Volume 7 DVD

Item# WMP7DVD

$19.99

Out of Stock

William Pleeth, teacher of the legendary Jaqueline du Pre' and many other internationally-recognized cellists, celebrated his eightieth birthday in 1996. To mark the event, a series of eight, one-hour films were made of his cello master classes at the Britten-Pears School for Advanced Musical Studies in Snape, England. The filmmakers captured William Pleeth in some of his finest work ever as a master teacher, in the best-known and loved repertoire for the cello: the Elgar Concerto, Beethoven, and Brahms Sonatas, the Hadyn D Major Concerto and the Tchaikovsky Rococo Variations.

William Pleeth Books & DVDs: Synopsis/reviews
Reviewer: Helen Neilson, London.

7. Beethoven: Sonata in A major, op. 69. Allegro ma non tanto.
Kate Bennett, vcl; Frances Angell, pno.

Kate Bennett makes a rich, luscious sound quality in the famous solo cello opening of this Sonata. He immediately praises her for her choice of fingering when she crosses to the D string for the second note, rather than sliding up the G string as so many cellists often tend to do. At all times, he reiterates how both fingerings and bowings must be chosen to elucidate the musical form. He suggests working on a passage in separate bows first in order to search for ultimate truth. Bowing, he says, has everything to do with phrasing, with form.
When Beethoven wrote this cello sonata, the cello was only just emerging as a prominent voice in relation to the piano. The partnership is all in the performance of such a piece. He does work on ensemble issues much of the time, encouraging the cellist to know whether or not to be prominent in relation to the piano; asking her to take her cue for articulation at times from the piano; and simply being able to give the impression of imitating the piano in the dialogue of this duo Sonata. He again encourages the idea of thinking orchestrally in choosing appropriate colours and articulation to bring different ideas to life.
An attribute which he often demanded his students to find was Courage! There is this passage saying to you, Be careful. Im difficult!, he says. But he encourages the student to aim for a feeling of spirit over one of care. Selma Gokcen, producer of this series, expanded beautifully upon this very point in the speech she gave at Pleeths memorial service: The concern about getting something right on the instrument can breed the wrong sort of effort. Worry about what might happen overtakes the moment, and takes the life out of the moment. William was fond of pointing out how we are our own worst enemy, both at the instrument and in life. Our need for security splits our creativity in two. He would say,Take the leap, go wrong, but live. Then one can learn what is required.


William Pleeth Review: Rob Lewis - London
Volume 7 Beethoven Sonata in A, Op. 69

Textures of sound are explored within this sonata. Pleeth describes the process of choosing bowings and fingerings in order to develop the musical form. This is clear when he demonstrates by following the shape of the music with the bow changes; the music is uninterrupted and each subject becomes more identifiable and clear. This idea is also applied to fingering. Where one of the passages is repeated, the second time he suggests using the open A, and consequently the music grows in intensity and contrast, taking it to a higher plane. He also discusses the importance of the articulation in the second subject, where, by not joining the notes together, the minor section has more dramatic impact. This space in between the notes builds the intensity within the music, conveying Beethovens intent more powerfully.

Recollections of a Peripatetic Pedagogue by John Kendall

Item# H324P

$19.95

Out of Stock

Suzuki pioneer John Kendall's recollections of events in his life and career. 130 page softcover book with over 50 photographs.

�The appropriateness of 'peripatetic pedagogue' to describe my career can best be understood by glancing at the maps in the endpapers of this book, where my travels, both national and international, are recorded. Indeed, a colleague once called me 'the Marco Polo of the Suzuki Method'. Another thought 'Johnny Appleseed of the Suzuki movement' might be appropriate. Fortunately, no one has yet designated me 'the Genghis Khan of the violin world', although the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun once described me as a member of the 'American Strange Teachers Association' � John Kendall

Nurtured by Love by S. Suzuki - Original and Revised Translations

Item# H2PX

$21.28

In Stock

The Original Translation of Dr. Suzuki's Classic Treatise on Talent Education
A case for early childhood education and the high potential of every human being, not just the seemingly gifted. Describes the discovery of Suzuki's philosophy and principles of his Method. (121 pp, paperback)

Dr. Suzuki presents his insights and makes the case that all humans have high potential, not just the seemingly gifted. From this insight came the development of the Suzuki Method for early childhood education. This book describes the discovery of Suzuki's philosophy and the principles of his Method. Translated by Waltraud Suzuki, published 1983, 107 pp, paperback.

Which should I choose � the original or revised translation?
The revised translation by Kyoko and Lili Selden adds a table of contents as well as a different viewpoint.

Compare the first paragraph for yourself:

Original translation (H2P)
:
All Japanese children speak Japanese
Oh � why, Japanese children can all speak Japanese! The thought suddenly struck me with amazement. In fact, all children throughout the world speak their native tongues with the utmost fluency. Any and every Japanese child � all speak Japanese without difficulty. Does that not show a startling talent? How, by what means, does this come about? I had to control an impulse to shout my joy over this discovery.

Revised translation (H2PN)
:
Children Throughout Japan Speak Japanese 
�Ohh! Children everywhere in Japan are speaking Japanese!�I leaped up in astonishment. Each and every child speaks Japanese freely, and they do so without any difficulty whatsoever. Isn't this a marvelous ability? Why is this? How has this come to pass? I could barely suppress my impulse to run into the streets, shouting.

The Advancing Cellist's Handbook - by Benjamin Whitcomb

Item# H337P

$24.95

Out of Stock

Lieberman, Julie Lyonn - Improvising Violin - Hal Leonard Edition

Item# 0156 000

$19.99

In Stock

Comprehensive guide to the art and science of successful string improvisation with clear, step-by-step explanations and instructions. Breaks down all of the components necessary to master improv. in jazz, blues, swing, folk, rock, and New Age styles. For the violinist who longs to leave the confines of the written page.Julie covers improvisation techniques in folk, blues, swing, jazz and New Age music as well as musicianship, theory and new mental and physical approaches to playing.

190 Items

Page 1 of 16

Next